Sunday, February 04, 2007

[THO] Resurrection and Grace

"The raising of Christ from death is an expression of the surplus of grace, for 'where sin abounded, grace abounded all the more' (Rom. 5.20). This added-value of grace becomes effective when liberation from the chains which bind the victims and the guilty to the past allows them to move out into the new shared life in the powers of God's righteousness."

- Jürgen Moltmann, In the End - The Beginning: The Life of Hope, Fortress, 2004.

9 comments:

Hank Harwell said...

Frank, I know that you were a big fan of Moltmann's work. So when I saw an article online about a seminar that featured Moltmann, I took a look. I'm a little concerned that as I read the write up of his comments, it appears that he supports a universal salvation wherein everyone is redeemed whether they have chosen to follow Christ or not. I'm a little unsure of this position. Perhaps I read him wrong. Anyway, here is the link for the article:
http://www.episcopalchurch.org/3577_81606_ENG_Print.html

nakedpastor said...

i love moltmann's theology of hope. good quote!

One of Freedom said...

Hey Hank,

The task of theology, from Moltmann's perspective, is to wrestle with the intersection of life and theological ideas. So you will find him pursuing lots of ideas that dogmatists would just cringe at. He teaches us how to engage with a theological issue and has an incredible depth of understanding from the whole history of Christianity. While I might not always agree with Moltmann, I am always impressed with his scholarship and the transparency of his starting points for doing theology. I'll look through the article, but it wouldn't surprise me if he engages with something that looks like universalism.

joey said...

I find this post in Theology and Biblical Studies Studies and perhaps going there would give us a clear picture on what is Moltmann's stand on Universalism.


You could say that Moltmann favors universalism. However he says that we are not free to wildly speculate about God’s plan; we are summoned simply to obedience and faith. The biblical message is the proclamation of the Gospel, with a call for humanity to respond in faith. Universalism would make the preaching of the Gospel and the appeal to faith completely superfluous, and “dissipates the finality of faith’s decision.” (The Coming of God, p242) If one’s salvation is contingent upon one’s faith, then the universal statements must speak only of God’s intention to save all, not that all will actually be saved. God intends to save all, but this will not be the outcome of history.

One of Freedom said...

Thank Joey. I took a brief look at the notes Hank pointed to, when I realized they were someones notes on his speach I thought that is not a good place to get your Moltmann, because you are interpreting someone's interpretation. I had intended to find something direct to point Hank to. I'm glad you beat me to it because I have been crazy busy.

byron said...

Page reference? (I know I should have it memorised...)

One of Freedom said...

Whoops. I guess I forgot that. p.75. I really like this little book, I'm trying to work a Moltmann angle on my Christology paper this semester. I'm toying with exploring the role of resurrection in the Theology of Hope (the category not necessarily just the book). Moltmann states that the resurrection is absolutely central to faith and others like Gerd Luedemann have tried to find a way forward if the historicity of the resurrection collapses.

Hank Harwell said...

Thanks, Frank and Joey. I knew that I might be treading on dangerous ground by basing what I understand of Moltmann from someone's notes on his presentation.

I can certainly feel better about the idea of salvation being entirely God's idea and plan, although not everyone will receive His gracious gift in faith.

One of Freedom said...

Hank, Moltmann is definitely worthwhile reading. He has had a profound influence on a lot of modern theological thought. He is one of the few serious theologians that had credibility with the Evangelicals and Pentecostals, though I'm not sure exactly why. Perhaps it is his language and the way he works with scripture. I discovered Moltmann in my second year of studies and have been a fan ever since. Anyone else that has struck my fancy as much has usually been Moltmann influenced as well. My friend Derek Morphew calls Moltmann a poet. Try to get ahold of Experiences in Theology which starts off with his testimony. I'm sure you will be encouraged, challenged and fall more in love with our amazing Saviour!